Research Staff

HannahAyasseHannah Ayasse

Research Assistant
Early Learning Project (PI: Barr)
413 White-Gravenor Hall
Email: hma78@georgetown.edu

Hannah graduated summa cum laude from The George Washington University with a degree in Psychology and Dance in May 2016. She now works in the ELP as the training and development coordinator for Just Beginning (previously Baby Elmo), a parent-child program designed specifically for fathers and their children aged 0 to 3. She came to the ELP as a SOAR-Minority Health and Health Disparities research fellow in June 2015 to conduct research on the differential impact of Baby Elmo on father-child and mother-child interactional quality within juvenile detention centers. Generally, Hannah is passionate about social justice and child development and follows these passions through her research and work with children and families in high-risk settings.

Brad Cherry

Laboratory Manager
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory (PI: Vaidya)
401 White-Gravenor Hall
Email: jc2588@georgetown.edu

As the DCNL’s laboratory manager, Brad is primarily responsible for assisting with the development and implementation of the lab’s various neuroimaging studies. After earning his B.A. in philosophy (honors, summa cum laude) from the University of the South in 2005, he went on to earn his J.D. from Washington & Lee University in 2010. His interests in both neuroscience and psychology grew from his fascination with, as a student of philosophy, neurophilosphical theories of the materiality of human cognition and perception, and as a student of law, legal applications of clinical psychological research and practice. These interests led ultimately to his post-B.A. study of psychology at the University of Kansas, where he began building his research experience in anticipation of pursuing future graduate studies in clinical psychology. He has previous research experience with Dr. Linda Mayes’ developmental electrophysiology lab at Yale University, Dr. Sarah Pressman’s clinical health psychology lab at the University of Kansas (now at the University of California, Irvine), and Dr. Amanda Bruce’s decision neuroscience lab at the University of Kansas Medical Center and Children’s Mercy Hospital.

NhiDinhNhi Dinh

Laboratory Manager
Laboratory for Relational Cognition (PI: Green)
305 White-Gravenor Hall
Email: nhi.dinh@georgetown.edu

Nhi started her post-college journey at the Laboratory for Relational Cognition in the fall of 2016. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Earlham College in May 2016 with a major in Neuroscience and minor in Film Studies. She is interested in researching how to implement findings on the neural mechanisms of learning and creativity in designing school curriculums. Through her senior research at Earlham on the acute effect of practicing yoga on cognitive performance and stress response, she also developed an interest in how physical activity and mindfulness practice can serve as preventative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. 

 
LydiaMeenaLYDIA MEENA

Laboratory Manager
Laboratory on Social and Affective Neuroscience (PI: Marsh)
304 White-Gravenor Hall
Email: lbm45@georgetown.edu

Lydia received her degree with majors in Psychology and Spanish from Georgetown University in 2016. Her prior research experience includes working in the Laboratory on Social & Affective Neuroscience since 2014, as well as working as a research assistant in the Infant Cognition Lab at the University of Kentucky. She has also worked as a youth mentor and tutor through Georgetown’s DC Reads literacy program. 

JoscelinRochaHidalgoJoscelin Rocha-Hidalgo

Laboratory Manager
Early Learning Project (PI: Barr)
413 White-Gravenor Hall
Email: jr1679@georgetown.edu

 Joscelin started her post-college journey at the Early Learning Project in the summer of 2016. She graduated from Berea College in May 2016 with a double major in Psychology and Child & Family Studies with a concentration in Child Development and a minor in French. Her research interests are bilingualism and language acquisition as well as how children learn from media and technology.